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Home Builder Grant: The 2020 $25k Build & Renovation Grant

Who is eligible for home builder grants, and how much will they have to spend? Even the cheapest renovations will require householders to stump up $125,000 A house being renovated in Brisbane on Thursday. The federal government will give eligible Australians $25,000...

COVID-19: Contactless Site Induction APP

HIA Making space on site: COVID-19 site induction HIA has developed a COVID-19 site induction to help builders and trade contractors include COVID-19 into their regular site induction processes. The HIA Making space on site: COVID-19 site induction uses the HIA...

Solar Guide: 2020 Guide to Solar Supply/Install Requirements

This Solar & Renewable Energy Guide is for you if you're considering investing in Solar   The three main components of a solar power system 1.  The panels, which will usually be either monocrystalline or polycrystalline. These are the two main types of solar...

NEW

Home Builder Grant: The 2020 $25k Build & Renovation Grant

Who is eligible for home builder grants, and how much will they have to spend? Even the cheapest renovations will require householders to stump up $125,000 A house being renovated in Brisbane on Thursday. The federal government will give eligible Australians $25,000...

COVID-19: Contactless Site Induction APP

HIA Making space on site: COVID-19 site induction HIA has developed a COVID-19 site induction to help builders and trade contractors include COVID-19 into their regular site induction processes. The HIA Making space on site: COVID-19 site induction uses the HIA...

Solar Guide: 2020 Guide to Solar Supply/Install Requirements

This Solar & Renewable Energy Guide is for you if you're considering investing in Solar   The three main components of a solar power system 1.  The panels, which will usually be either monocrystalline or polycrystalline. These are the two main types of solar...
COVID-19: Contactless Site Induction APP

COVID-19: Contactless Site Induction APP

HIA Making space on site: COVID-19 site induction

HIA has developed a COVID-19 site induction to help builders and trade contractors include COVID-19 into their regular site induction processes.

The HIA Making space on site: COVID-19 site induction uses the HIA SafeScan QR Code to enable a contactless site induction for everyone who enters a building site.

The one QR code can be used across all worksites wherever mobile device coverage is available.

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How HIA SafeScan works

The following steps will help you with downloading and using the induction sign:

Builders and anyone responsible for managing access to a building site

  1. Download the HIA SafeScan COVID-19 site induction sign and add your preferred company email address for the return of completed site inductions.
  2. Make sure you are familiar with the process that people who enter your site will experience when they scan the QR Code:
    • Scan the QR Code using a QR code reader app or on newer mobiles use your camera to access the link.
    • Review the site induction form and the information that users will be requested to supply.
    • Review the attachments in the form. These provide users with the HIA Making space on site guidelines for new homes or renovations.
    • To test it works, fill in and submit the site induction form. Add in your preferred email address for receiving the completed induction forms to be sent to. Note: if possible, create a dedicated email address for receipt of the site induction forms (PDF documents) for your company, or for a specific site/project.
  3. Print the site induction sign.
  4. Laminate the sign and place in a prominent location at the entrance/s to the building site (ideally located next to a copy of the HIA Making space on site guidelines for new homes or renovations).
  5. Email any trade contractors, employees or suppliers, who will access your building site, with information about the COVID-19 site induction and explain how your company will use it. This should include advice that before entering the site they should complete the COVID-19 site induction by:
    • Accessing the COVID-19 site induction sign with the QR code.
    • Scanning the QR Code using a QR code reader on their mobile device.
    • Completing the site induction form on their mobile device. Note: Where more than one person from the same company is completing the site induction a single form can be used.
    • Submitting the completed site induction form to you by entering your preferred email address.

 

Visitors to a building site: trade contractors, employees or suppliers

Before you enter a building site all trade contractors, employees, suppliers, and other visitors need to:

  1. Locate the COVID-19 site induction sign.
  2. Scan the QR Code on the sign using a QR code reader or camera on your mobile device.
  3. Complete the site induction form on your mobile device.
  4. Where more than one person from the same company is completing the site induction, add the name and signature of each person doing the induction into the form.
  5. Submit the completed site induction form to the builder/site supervisor by adding the preferred email address they have provided.

For more information visit the HIA website – Read More.. 

Six Finalists to Develop Designs for Iconic New Parramatta Precinct

Six Finalists to Develop Designs for Iconic New Parramatta Precinct

Six Global Architecture Teams Have Been Shortlisted to Develop Designs for a Landmark new Powerhouse Precinct in Sydney’s Parramatta.

The Powerhouse Precinct is one of the largest cultural infrastructure projects currently being undertaken in Australia.

The centrepiece of the precinct is a 24-hour museum – a new global cultural icon – that will be built on the banks of the Parramatta River in Sydney’s newly-designated Central River City, one of the fastest-growing parts of the region.

The museum is set to showcase the internationally-significant Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences collection and support a dynamic program of changing exhibitions.

The Powerhouse Precinct, boasting 18,000 square metres of purpose-built exhibition spaces, public realm and a pedestrian bridge, represents a major investment by the NSW Government – with the base construction budget set at $400 Million.

In January 2019, a two-stage international design competition was launched, aiming to identify and select an outstanding design team and concept design for the precinct.

Endorsed by the Australian Institute of Architects, the competition welcomed local and international design teams and strongly encouraged creative and intellectual collaborations between established and emerging talent.

On Thursday NSW Minister for the Arts, Don Harwin, revealed that the first stage of the competition attracted an impressive 74 submissions from 20 countries, made up of 529 individual firms from five continents.

The finalist international-Australian and Australian teams are (in alphabetical order):

  • AL_A (UK) and Architectus (Australia)
  • Bernardes Architecture (Brazil) and Scale Architecture (Australia)
  • BVN Architecture (Australia) and Carlo Ratti Associati (Italy)
  • CHROFI (Australia) with Reko Rennie (Australia)
  • Moreau Kusunoki (France) and Genton (Australia)
  • Steven Holl Architects (United States) and Conrad Gargett (Australia)

“I am particularly thrilled to see our finalist teams include Australian lead firms, collaborations between emerging and seasoned practices and between Australian and international talent who have been inspired by the opportunity this bold and exciting project offers,” Minister Harwin said.

The six finalists will now visit the Parramatta site in June 2019 and will have three months to develop their concept designs, which will be displayed to the public in a physical exhibition and online gallery before a jury meets to determine the successful design.

Influential Australian entrepreneur, Naomi Milgrom AO, is Jury Chair and Chair of the Shortlisting Panel.

Ms Milgrom has an acclaimed track record for bringing future-minded architecture and design to the community and has collaborated with some of the world’s leading architects and urban thinkers through her MPavilion program (regarded as Australia’s principal architecture commission) and the Living Cities Forum (an annual gathering of leading global architects and design innovators).

“We are grateful to the Australian and international architectural community for the enthusiasm and rigour that ran through the responses. We were excited to have such a field of designers to choose from,” Ms Milgrom shared.

“This project’s success depends on having faith in creative talent and we achieved our aim – a shortlist strong in fascinating and new collaborations that showed the project’s Australian and international reach. The responses showed a deep interest in the project and its unique promise for the future,” she commented.

Each finalist team will now receive an honorarium of $150,000 to develop design concepts, with a winner set to be announced in late 2019.

QLD Gov’s Safer Buildings Program Clears Nearly 14,000 Private Buildings

QLD Gov’s Safer Buildings Program Clears Nearly 14,000 Private Buildings

The Queensland Government’s Safer Buildings Combustible Cladding Checklist program has cleared almost 14,000 private buildings – confirming they are safe and secure for tenants and workers.

The program was established in 2018 to ensure all Queensland buildings meet safety requirements regarding building material use and provide occupants a ‘right to know’ if their home or workplace does not pass the test.

Under the program, which is conducted in three parts, nearly 14,000 private building combustible cladding assessments have already been completed and cleared, with two more years to go until the completion of the entire audit program.

Minister for Housing and Public Works, Mick de Brenni, said that under Part 1 of the program, 13,715 registrants out of 20,380 had successfully completed the audit at zero cost. The remaining 5026 registrants in the program will take Part 2 to rule out that the building is clad in combustible material.

“It’s been very pleasing to see that 14,000 building owners doing the right thing and clearing their building as safe,” said Mr de Brenni.

“Having almost 14,000 buildings registered means those who live and work there will now have peace of mind.”

After several fires in other states, the Commonwealth commissioned a national review that identified failure to comply with fire engineering guidelines had become a serious issue over many years.

Mr de Brenni said the report confirmed that the Queensland process was indeed required.

“The Shergold Weir Review showed that a minority in the building industry had failed to follow the rules and was putting lives at risk,” he stated.

Mr de Brenni further detailed that the building materials sector had worked hard to ensure that information about the safe use of materials was made available to consumers and builders.

“Building materials, when used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions are safe – that’s why manufacturers publish details of how they should be used. These details must be available and are usually easily identified on the manufacturer’s website.”

Part 2 of the Safer Buildings program will give building owners until 29 May 2019 to seek professional advice to confirm if their building meets the Safer Buildings guidelines.

“We will not risk discovering the next unlawful use of combustible cladding through a loss of Queenslanders lives in a high-rise building fire like those overseas,” the Minister said, “building owners who already know or suspect they have combustible cladding on their building are able to progress directly to Part 3 of the program, saving the cost of engaging a building industry professional.”

“So far the Safer Buildings process has done exactly what it needed to do – and thankfully owners are treating this issue seriously. It’s heartening to see that tenants’ safety is being put first, especially by those building owners going ahead to Part 3 of the program,” Mr de Brenni concluded.

Building owners required to complete Part 2 of the Safer Buildings combustible cladding checklist before 29 May 2019 can find more information here.